Posted on

Hong Kong’s top 10 budget restaurants

There are plenty of fantastic budget restaurants in Hong Kong, says Susan Jung, food editor of the South China Morning Post. You can even get Michelin-starred dim sum for £5

• As featured in our Hong Kong city guide

This small noodle stall is hidden in the bowels of the Haiphong Road Temporary Market – which is temporary in name only as it’s been open for more than 30 years. Walk past the butchers, flower stalls and fruit and vegetable vendors, and head deep into the centre of the market, looking for customers eating noodles served in bright orange bowls with yellow spoons. The star of the show is the beef balls, served in a rich, light broth with your choice of noodles, and optional beef tripe or brisket. Delicately flavoured with ginger and dried tangerine peel, the balls have the perfect “bouncy” texture beloved by the Chinese – often mistakenly regarded as “rubbery” by the uninitiated.
Haiphong Road Temporary Market, 390 Haiphong Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, +852 2376 1179. A bowl will set you back around £2. Open 8.30am-8.30pm

Continue reading…

Posted on

Top 10 beaches in Hong Kong

Hong Kong isn’t all banks and skyscrapers. There are plenty of great beaches to swim, sunbathe, surf and windsurf on, says Vaudine England – and don’t be put off by the shark nets

• As featured in our Hong Kong city guide

Most visitors to Lantau Island aim for the orderly sands of Silvermine Bay, the closest beach to the ferry port at Mui Wo, but better swimming can be had along Lantau’s southern coast at Upper and Lower Cheung Sha Beaches. These are the longest stretches of sand in Hong Kong, ringed by peaks and, closer by, South African restaurant The Stoep, and High Tide, a Thai-Chinese eatery where most of the ingredients are grown in its garden. Just beyond Lower Cheung Sha Beach is Tong Fuk, another fine stretch of wild sand and sea edged with rocks.
After getting the ferry from Central to Mui Wo, take buses 1, 2, 4 or A35 along the South Lantau Road

Continue reading…