Posted on

East London’s top 10 budget restaurants

Guardian Travel is currently compiling a thorough overview of London’s best budget eateries. In his second instalment, Tony Naylor heads out east, into Shoreditch, Hackney and beyond
If we’ve missed your favourite tell us on our Word of Mouth blog
As featured in our London city guide

On the face of it, let alone in a “budget eats” feature, £5.70 seems an awful lot to pay for a bacon butty. It is one of the themes of this series, however, that – particularly when you’re eating on a tight budget – value is more important than cost. And the St John bacon butty is indisputably worth every one of those 570 pennies. It comprises two large chargrilled slices of proper artisan bread from the on-site bakery, thickly buttered and liberally stuffed with Gloucester Old Spot bacon. The rashers have a good three-quarter-inch rim of gloriously silky translucent fat around their outer edge. In its generosity, its use of supreme ingredients, in its hilarious disregard for anything you might describe as healthy eating, it is Fergus Henderson (owner of this and the more famous parent restaurant, St John) on a plate. There are also kippers, pikelets or, if you really insist, porridge and prunes available for breakfast, but that bacon butty will set you up for the day like nothing else. From 11am, Bread & Wine – a pleasingly spartan former bank – serves elevenses, cakes and whatnot. Then, from lunch onwards the menu consists of small ‘n’ large plates (£4-£15), which people mix ‘n’ match, splashing the cash. That said, if you can squeeze in for a simple bowl of celeriac and bacon soup, do (£5.90).
Breakfast £2.60-£5.70, elevenses cakes £2.90. 94-96 Commercial Street, E1 (+44 (0)20-3301 8069, stjohnbreadandwine.com)

Continue reading…

Posted on

Top 10 things to do in Lyon

France’s third city and gastronomic capital is known for its historical and architectural landmarks, but many of its treasures are to be found in its hidden passageways

There’s more to Lyon than the opulent facade would suggest. Beyond the pricey boutiques and restaurants of the Presqu’île (“the peninsula”), girded by the Rhône and the Saône, this is a city of secret passageways, hidden alleys and courtyards tucked away behind sumptuous hôtel particulier fronts. Explore Lyon’s alternative side on a tour of some of its best-kept secrets.

Continue reading…